Blurred lines between labour and leisure

Untitled Infographic

As a direct result of the ever-evolving technological world we find ourselves immersed in, old perceptions about work are undergoing a complete reconstruct. Gregg has coined the term, “presence bleed”, which “arises when the workplace and the home are seen as interchangeable locations for work that fluctuate in degrees of attractiveness depending on the nature of the competing tasks to be completed.” This is a growing phenomenon — people are increasingly enjoying, and are capable of, flexible working conditions which allow them to work from home occasionally. This infographic looks at the quantitative data that has been collected on the liquid labour phenomenon and also explores the ways in which it has altered old perceptions about work.

Those who choose to work from home are however struggling to distinguish what actually counts as work due to the fact that the boundaries between labour and leisure, work and home have blurred to such an extent (Gregg). This is what is known as liquid labour, when labour and leisure pour into each other. This has proven to surface several consequences such as those discussed in the infographic as well as “difficulty maintaining family relationships, using days off to catch up on unfinished tasks, as well as regular interruptions to sleep patterns and other physical ailments” (Gregg).

References:

Gregg, M. ‘Function Creep: Communication technologies and anticipatory labour in the information workplace’

http://www.forbes.com/sites/laurashin/2014/01/17/work-from-home-the-top-100-companies-offering-flexible-jobs-in-2014/

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/australian-bureau-of-statistics-says-1-in-12-people-work-more-at-home-but-new-research-shows-it-can-leave-you-a-little-bit-lonely/story-fneszs56-1226675067941

http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/business-it/working-from-home-growing-in-popularity-20130225-2f23e.html

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